Participate in Studies

The Brain Behaviour Laboratory is always recruiting adults who have suffered a stroke, have Parkinson’s disease, or are neurologically healthy to participate in research. We are also investigating motor learning in children with developmental disorders and their neurologically healthy peers.

If you would like to volunteer to be a part of any of our research studies please feel free to contact us. When recruiting for studies, information will be posted on this page about what type of people we are looking for as subjects. Detailed information about some of our current and past studies available on the research page.

 

 

Cristina Rubino PhD Thesis Study

The sensorimotor imaging & learning (SMiLE) study will evaluate how oculomotor control contributes to implicit motor learning in young and older adults. Participants will practice a novel skilled reaching task for 3 days and undergo structural and functional MRI before and after training. We will investigate change in brain connectivity associated with motor learning. Our findings will contribute to better understanding of the underlying mechanisms contributing to skill learning in healthy adults and after stroke.

If you are interested in participating, please contact Cristina Rubino (doctoral student) at 

 

 

 

EEG MOTION Study- Using Electroencephalography (EEG) to define Motor Function Study

Lead Researcher: Christy Jones PhD Candidate, Rehabilitation Sciences

Study start date: Spring 2022

Who can participate:
Healthy individuals between the ages of 18-85
 • Individuals who have experienced a stroke (> 6 months ago) and are aged 50-85

What is involved: 1 visit (2 hours total) to the UBC Center for Brain Health

The purpose of this research project is to investigate different measures of brain activity that are responsible for our movements, using a technique called Electroencephalography (EEG). We are interested in whether we can use measurable signals of brain activity to assess the degree of lost function after a stroke as well as baseline function in healthy individuals. During this study you will wear an EEG cap (similar to a swim cap), that will record your brain activity while you complete simple movements of your upper and lower limbs.

Interested? Contact Christy Jones: christina.jones@ubc.ca or view our research information poster.