Former Trainees

After completing her training Nicole took a position as Practice Lead, Neuroservice, Vancouver General Hospital

Upon completion of his training Michael took up the position of Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University

After leaving the lab Sonia took a position as Research Assistant, UBC Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology

Kate Brown completed her undergraduate degree in Kinesiology with a minor in Psychology at the University of Waterloo. She went on to complete a Master of Science in the Faculty of Medicine in Rehabilitation Science at the University of British Columbia. With the supervision of Lara Boyd in the Brain Behaviour Lab, she studied the role of the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices in attentional effects on sensory processing. Currently, she is completing her PhD in Rehabilitation Science. Specifically, she is studying the role of sensorimotor integration in motor learning.

Upon leaving the lab Katherine entered the Masters of Physical Therapy clinical program at UBC

Upon leaving the lab Liz began her graduate training as a MSc/PhD Student in the  Rehabilitation Science Graduate Program, UBC

Upon leaving the lab Jodi took up a position as Post-doctoral researcher in Dr. Sandra Black’s lab at Sunnybrook Health Sciences

Jacob Jackson completed his BSc in Physics at the University of British Columbia. His undergraduate research utilized cutting-edge neuroimaging techniques to investigate the ability of the brain to experience structural changes in response to learning novel motor movements. Expanding upon his undergraduate work, Jacob is currently using a semi-immersive virtual reality environment as a means of neurorehabilitation for individuals with stroke. Jacob is most interested in understanding the mechanisms of neuroplasticity and employing neuroimaging to quantify structural and functional changes.

 

Upon leaving the lab Paul took a position as Research Assistant, Department of Audiology, UBC

Bimal Lakhani completed his BSc in Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo and his MSc and PhD degrees at the University of Toronto in the Department of Rehabilitation Science. His graduate work investigated the central nervous system mechanisms involved in the generation of rapid corrective balance recovery movements, which are typically impaired following stroke. Despite the increased likelihood of survival following stroke, the functional deficits suffered by stroke survivors are numerous. In the Brain Behaviour Lab at UBC, Bimal is interested in utilizing novel imaging techniques in order to investigate the mechanisms associated with learning-dependent changes of white matter in the stroke affected central nervous system. Bimal’s research interests are focused on improving the overall quality of life of stroke survivors by understanding the specific mechanisms that result in mobility and motor control limitations and by developing novel rehabilitation strategies that target those limitations.

After graduation Meghan took up a position as a Research Assistant

Upon completion of his training Sean took up a position as Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University

Upon leaving the lab Bubble began her Post-doctoral training at Simon Fraser University

Upon graduation Catherine took a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science at University of Kansas Medical Center

After graduation Eric began Post-doctoral training at the University of Kansas medical Center

Katie Wadden completed her undergraduate degree in Kinesiology at Memorial University of Newfoundland where she began her research career studying the effect of acute hypoxia on muscle contracile properties. Katie continued research in the field of exercise physiology at Memorial University of Newfoundland and completed a Masters of Science in Kinesiology. Her research interest was directed towards the role of the stretch shortening cycling (SSC) during slow and rapid SSC movements. She studied neuromuscular responses via electromyography (EMG) following different forms of SSC training. Currently Katie is pursuing a PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences in the Faculty of Medicine at UBC. The aim of her research is to determine the role working memory plays in implicit motor learning. Her research will focus on studying the healthy brain through the use of TMS and brain imaging techniques during motor learning paradigms to further understand the role memory plays during the acquisition of motor skills.

After graduation Jeanie took up a position as a Research Assistant

After completion of her degree, Jill took up a Post-doctoral fellowship at BC Children’s then returned to UBC as Assistant Professor in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy